Saturday, October 8, 2011

Staying contemporary II

So, if that is not the way to training people on customer service what is? I have not crystallized on an idea right away, but there are some formative thoughts.

But more than that, as a trainer, it is important that a training deliver cutting edge stuff to you. Especially when it comes to senior managers. Usually companies have a culture of service (by and large) - when you train frontline management it is important that we reinforce the culture (how do you do it - therein lies a later post). But as you go higher up, what does one do? What do they expect out of it? What can we give them that we already dont know? Most senior managers would be well read in those usual suspects - the HBRs, the McKinseys and other magazines. So, giving them anything out of any of these publications would be a waste of time for them. And mind you, most of these publications are not necessarily ahead of the curve as much as they are on the curve.

So, what constitutes your trainings? How do you get them? How do you keep your trainings contemporary? How do you stay contemporary as a trainer?

3 comments:

  1. Very relevant and pertinent questions indeed. One possible approach could be to solicit responses from participants. i.e. just after summarizing a learning, urge the participants to reflect on recent events where similar learnings could be applicable and elaborate on the same. This could lead to a very engaging conversation, possibly a healthy debate as other participants may add their two bits (we want to look good as well you see...) on how there is a better example in recent times that exemplifies the learnings. You just smile and enjoy the ride... a totally win-win situation, or so I think.

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  2. Create case studies from different industries - good and bad examples - rip them apart in workshops?

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  3. In my mind a trainer needs to be a practitioner as well to stay contemporary. Although his training practice is his main game, it is important to keep a 'sandbox' organization where he can try out his new ideas and practice the same skills he is trying to impart. Impractical? not at all if the will is there. Ethical? You betcha!

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